Project Description

Mosquitos

There are probably several unexpected mosquito breeding areas around your property. Besides emptying water out of flower pots, bird baths and old tires, make sure to clean gutters and downspouts regularly or cover with mesh to prevent leaves and debris from collecting and holding water. Children’s toys and playground equipment can have small crevices where water can collect. A few other odd places where water can collect include your car, landscape statues, rain gauge, garden hoses and even large plant leaves. If a full plastic garbage bag sits in the rain, it can develop a small pocket where water can collect. Remember, it only takes about a cup of water for mosquitoes to breed. Just because your yard may be free of standing water, it does not mean your neighbor’s yard is too.

Most mosquito species prefer to lay eggs at the edge of water bodies against mulch, grass, foliage or refuse that will hold the eggs at the surface of the water. If the water evaporates – or you pour it out – before the eggs develop, which usually takes about seven to 10 days, the eggs will not develop completely into adults, and they will die. If water is not present but the ground is moist, those eggs can sit for months until there is enough water to float the eggs to develop and feed the larva.

There are more than 3,000 mosquito species throughout the world, and about 200 of those exist in North America. Prime mosquito biting hours are between dusk and dawn, but some species are active during the day.